Sex after Abortion

Sex after abortion is the most common query most people tend to make. Doctors usually ask couples to avoid having intercourse for at least two weeks after an abortion (termination). Women tend to bleed for up to two weeks and in some cases, the bleeding may continue right up until the next period. Hence, it is advised that you don’t have sex for at least two weeks. You must ideally wait until the bleeding has completely stopped. This is important to reduce the risk of infection.

Make sure you get in touch with your gynaecologist in case, you experience any of the following:

Pain that lasting pain

Unusual vaginal discharge

Severe and nonstop bleeding

Raised temperature

The above listed symptoms indicate that you have an infection that demands immediate treatment.

The major reason why you should avoid having intercourse for at least a week after your abortion is that there is a small risk of infection after this procedure. There are chances you may not contract any infection after you had sex. But it is still important to follow precautions.

Many women tend to contract an infection and it can be signified by symptoms such as an unusual discharge or abdominal pain. In case, you have not suffered from any of the symptoms, it is unlikely that you have had any infection.

Any signs of infections should be immediately attended to and informed to the medical care practitioners.

Another reason you should avoid sex is because you may conceive again. Getting pregnant again without recovering completely after abortion can be dangerous for your health. As per recommendations by experts, a normal couple can conceive in six cycles. Also it is crucial to remember that it is quite early to get pregnant. Hence, you should try to relax. Getting preoccupied with pregnancy may not be the right choice for you. The decision may take toll over your health.

Also make double sure that you are utilizing the right technique of contraception. The key is to choose a method that perfectly suits your body. You must pay a visit to your gynaecologist or general physician to get adept advice. Referring to a local family planning clinic for advice will also serve the purpose.

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